The African Dwarf Frog

Hymenochirus boettgeri or Hymenochirus curtipes

Dwarf African Frog
An extreme close-up of our goggle-eyed friend, larger than life size

 
This is the "Dwarf" African frog, not to be confused with the African Clawed Frog which can get pretty big. Dwarfs usually get to a maximum of about 1 and a half inches. You can know you have a real Dwarf if you look at it's foot, it should be webbed, if not then it might be a African Clawed Frog.
 
Dwarfs are totally aquatic and very easy to care for, they are not too particular about their water, and as long as the temperature is somewhere between 68 and 85°F (20-30° C) they are happy.
 
African Dwarf Frogs do need a covered aquarium or bowl, they will attempt to escape otherwise.
 
Dwarfs might eventually learn to accept flakes but usually you'll have to feed them frozen foods such as bloodworms or brine shrimp. Live foods are even better, they will eagerly accept any live worms small enough to swallow along with adult or baby brineshrimp, daphnia, tiny fish and aquatic insects.
 

 
Dwarf frogs are usually quite disease free, and they are peaceful occupants in an aquarium with similar sized fish. They will eat small fry, and they are sometimes picked on by larger fish. Dwarf frogs are considered by some to be very good companions for Bettas.
whose yo daddy? whose yo dadeee
Heres a picture of the male holding the female in the classic spawning embrace.
follow the leader
Follow The Leader
 

I smell FOOD!